+1 954 541 9464 info@bosscgc.com Mon - Fri 09:00 AM - 6:00 PM 3101 N. Federal Highway, Suite 402 Oakland Park, Florida 33306

Negative aspects of un-permitted work for the new owner | Miami Open Permits Solution

0
BOSS Construction Group
BOSS Construction Group
Negative aspects of un-permitted work for the new owner | Miami Open Permits Solution
/

Are there negative aspects of un-permitted work for the new owner? Benjamin Sens from BOSS Construction Group, explains the aspects and the situation that can happen in the future.

Benjamin answers, “so un-permitted work may have a problem in the future, it may not depending on the improvements you want to do, depending on the city that you’re in or the municipality.”

Need to close an open permit or code violation? Please call us at (954)541-9464 or email us at info@bosscgc.com.

Transcript

Justin Nepola (host)
interject real quick because we have an excellent question that follows up on what you’re discussing right now. And Eric would like to know what are the negative aspects of unpermitted work done in a home if the buyer is aware and doesn’t care that the work done hasn’t been permitted, permitted? If the city doesn’t know unpermitted work has been done, what are the negative aspects of this for the new owner? This is an excellent question. We live in South Florida. It’s the land of unpermitted work. Before you go on to the next topic, what can you address? What would happen to the new owner?

Benjamin Sens
Great question, Eric. So again, just because something is done without a permit, it doesn’t mean that the work is bad. Now, going back to what my example I was using, for the new buyer who’s purchasing the house, let’s say it’s a single family inventory, as we know is very limited. Every single family mostly has some type of work that was done without a permit, a kitchen remodel, even if they put everything in the same place, sink and stove, that requires a permit because you’re touching the electrical and the backsplash and you’re resetting the sink. Same thing with bathrooms. So the only reason why an open interior renovation permit, let’s say, would come into an issue for the prospective buyer is number one. Let’s say the work is faulty, and they have an insurance claim, which we deal with all the time. And they might go back to look and see if work was permitted to deny or undervalued. Usually it’s to deny or accept the claim. The second thing is, so say for example, I have a brand new kitchen and bathroom, I bought the house, everything’s remodeled, I want to change my impact windows and doors. So usually the city’s pretty cool. They’re just looking at the impact windows and doors, they need to go outside and inside to inspect the top cons and the fasteners that should be installed properly. Consumer Protection like we would want them to. But say the kitchen is brand new, and flawless beautiful countertops. Shining, there could be a problem when you invite the city in the house to come and get your window and door permit. So all of those things are potentials and they could happen. But it’s important for us to advise our buyers accordingly and have the sellers fill out their sellers, disclosure and property inspectors, which I’m not, general property inspectors we hire during our inspection period to represent the buyer that the buyer brings in. It’s all over the general property inspection. They do not cover open permits or unpermitted work or expired work. The only thing they’re looking for is roof life for insurance purposes to see the last. The last time a roofing permit was pulled. So unpermitted work may have to get back to your question, Eric, and thank you Justin. unpermitted work may have a problem in the future, it may not depending on the improvements you want to do, depending on the city that you’re in or the municipality. So that pretty much sums up that question.

About the author

Leave a Reply